Author Topic: Canning  (Read 4187 times)

Offline ONGardener

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Canning
« on: January 16, 2016, 12:29:37 PM »
This past year I have been doing a lot of canning, mostly for the farmers market. I only use a water bath canner, so everything is pickled. I may invest in a pressure canner for things like Tomato sauce and greens this season.
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Offline LoneWolf

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Re: Canning
« Reply #1 on: January 18, 2016, 06:41:48 AM »
Looking good!

Online Maggie13

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Re: Canning
« Reply #2 on: January 18, 2016, 07:29:15 AM »
Canning is so rewarding on a personal level.
 To help pay for supplies by selling some of your pickled crops is cool!


Do you have to have a "Kitchen" inspection or anything special to add canned goods to your line up?
Do you wholesale your jarred items to local shops?

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Offline ONGardener

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Re: Canning
« Reply #3 on: January 18, 2016, 11:52:46 AM »
Maggie,

The farmers market I attend I am allowed to make the product at my house and sell them there. I can also sell the jars from the farm, as our zoning allows it. I don't sell any to any stores. I don't have the quantity for that, nor do I want to make that my main focus. It is something extra to have on my table and as luck would have it, people like it and buy a lot, lol.
Market gardening in Ontario, Canada.
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Offline Jo-Ann

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Re: Canning
« Reply #4 on: January 18, 2016, 05:06:26 PM »
Look into the Cottage Industry laws for your state. Here in Louisiana, I can sell my homemade jams & jellies made in my home's uninspected kitchen at a local farmers market. Some of the requirements are sales less than $20k per year, no paid employees, retail sales only. There are other restrictions but I can't remember all of them right now.
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Offline knyquol

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Re: Canning
« Reply #5 on: January 18, 2016, 09:01:03 PM »
Looks awesome Jake!!

Offline Turkeybend

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Re: Canning
« Reply #6 on: January 24, 2016, 11:15:38 AM »
You can go crazy in the canning process by canning everything in site, arranging it on the shelf and just admiring the final product.  Just remember to crack open some of the stuff and eat it!  I really like looking at all my canned veggies, jelly's, green beans, blackened peas all lookin good in the jars and on MY shelf!  We always say a special pray of thanks when we all sit down at the dinner table for the strength and ability to eat from God's garden - what a Blessing it is!
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Offline Double B

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Re: Canning
« Reply #7 on: January 24, 2016, 11:54:43 AM »
You can go crazy in the canning process by canning everything in site, arranging it on the shelf and just admiring the final product.  Just remember to crack open some of the stuff and eat it!  I really like looking at all my canned veggies, jelly's, green beans, blackened peas all lookin good in the jars and on MY shelf!  We always say a special pray of thanks when we all sit down at the dinner table for the strength and ability to eat from God's garden - what a Blessing it is!

Well said, Turkeybend,

Being grateful for the bounty we have is always the top priority. You are also correct in admiring canned goods. They are like art to us gardeners  :)
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Offline woodchip gardener

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Re: Canning
« Reply #8 on: May 25, 2016, 01:00:18 PM »
for all you canning fans...saw this online today.  someone ripped up their carpet to replace and found the door to the old cellar.  would not eat that stuff, but the old jars look cool.

http://imgur.com/a/ned0p
post something!  c'mon...you know ya wanna...  :)

Offline tangentalstorm

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Re: Canning
« Reply #9 on: May 25, 2016, 04:29:49 PM »
That is just way way cool. I would love to find something like that.
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Offline woodchip gardener

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Re: Canning
« Reply #10 on: May 27, 2016, 03:56:47 PM »
good news!  when i spoke to my aunt yesterday i mentioned trying to get into canning.  she says she used to can and has a pressure canner i can have!  woo!   now i just have to drive to PA to go pick it up...lol.    i will be going up at some point over the holidays...so will pick it up then. 
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Offline tbird

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Re: Canning
« Reply #11 on: May 29, 2016, 01:59:33 PM »
  I started out canning primarily veggies and stocks.  Then I moved to more complex things like meat sauces and cooked meats.  After a year or so of those things I started canning meats like chicken, beef, pork and fish.  Now since I have a garden 365 days a year with various veggies I do mostly meat canning with limited seasonal veggie canning of those things like beans and maters.  I just went through a 43 hour power outage and it is nice to have little frozen food and over 500 jars of food sitting on a shelf inside.   :D

  Turkeybend offers good advice.  Sometimes the thought that canned goods are "great for emergencies" can hinder some people from actually using their canned stuff.  Use it and just keep replenishing it.  It saves time preparing meals using canned goods and tastes great. 

  The best chicken noodle soup I ever tasted was made with canned chicken breast tenders and the broth they produce when canned "cold pack" without liquid.  Fantastic stuff.    ;)
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Offline FLfarmer

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Re: Canning
« Reply #12 on: May 30, 2016, 09:11:12 PM »
I recently took my first shot at canning.  It sure is a lot of work to grow and can your own food but I find it very rewarding!  Here is the video:
https://youtu.be/p7Fkb9KvdVg

Offline crazyhorse

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Re: Canning
« Reply #13 on: May 31, 2016, 12:55:06 AM »
You can go crazy in the canning process by canning everything in site, arranging it on the shelf and just admiring the final product.  Just remember to crack open some of the stuff and eat it!  I really like looking at all my canned veggies, jelly's, green beans, blackened peas all lookin good in the jars and on MY shelf!  We always say a special pray of thanks when we all sit down at the dinner table for the strength and ability to eat from God's garden - what a Blessing it is!

Mr Turkey, I agree with you.

I like that last sentence.

My wife & I do the same.


Offline Double B

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Re: Canning
« Reply #14 on: May 31, 2016, 08:02:20 AM »
Canning can be a lot of work. We have been blessed to have had a bumper crop of tomatoes this year and have given so many away to family and friends. In addition, we have canned around 30 pints of tomatoes and 50 pints of blue lake green beans. While nothing looks any prettier than beautiful jars of freshly preserved garden goodies we try very hard to not waste anything from our garden. I have a very good friend that eats out of his garden but procrastinates about preserving his harvest and consequently wastes lots of food. I know it bothers him and he swears they are going to do better. We rely on our food and enjoy the fresh stuff especially but the canned ( and frozen ) stuff sustains us all the way through the year. I have a hard time seeing anything go to waste.
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Online GopherBroke

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Re: Canning
« Reply #15 on: May 31, 2016, 09:36:53 AM »
Double B You might tell your friend that rather than let his produce go to waste that there may be a homeless shelter nearby that would send out a couple of workers to harvest what he doesn't use or want.  We do a fair amount of canning and freezing of our garden bounty, and we raise extra for the local homeless shelter.  The shelter requires residents to work for their supper and one of those ways is picking vegetables which the kitchen staff processes either for immediate use or put away.  We have extra cabbage, swiss chard, green beans, hot peppers and such just for the shelter.   It doesn't take much extra work to take care of, and there is a huge upside to helping feed some more people than just your family and friends. 
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Offline cappy

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Re: Canning
« Reply #16 on: June 27, 2016, 02:54:52 PM »
One things for sure aint gonna happen in Cajun country either a cellar would fill up with water or pop out of the ground like a cork when it rained.  We do love to can stuff though.  It's fun and a great way to save stuff. 

Offline woodchip gardener

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Re: Canning
« Reply #17 on: March 17, 2017, 09:11:12 AM »
finally got to pa to pick up the canning jars and pot from my aunt!  she also gave me several books about canning.  can't wait to learn how to can!

post something!  c'mon...you know ya wanna...  :)

Offline Gymgirl

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Re: Canning
« Reply #18 on: March 17, 2017, 01:07:40 PM »
You're gonna love it!

Start with some simple BALL BLUE BOOK recipes.  One word of caution: if you consult YouTube videos, make SURE whoever you're following uses USDA approved practices.

I learned most of what I know about canning following "imstillworkin" (Susan) on YouTube.  She is phenomenal, and I've never had a problem with any of her practices (very systematically organized), her recipes, or her philosophies about canning.  And, she's perfectly ok with saying, "this is how I do it.  You can do it any way you chose to..." 

Just don't end up getting Botulism, and say you got "alternative facts" from Susan!
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Online bigboberta

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Re: Canning
« Reply #19 on: March 17, 2017, 02:33:44 PM »
USDA has  a canning guide that can be downloaded free.  It is 7 different downloads, 1 for each chapter.  It can  be downloaded at this site  http://nchfp.uga.edu/publications/publications_usda.html        If you have a Ball Blue Book, the information for times and temperature is the same, which is what I go by.

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