Author Topic: Drainage  (Read 342 times)

Offline CORVETTE62US

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Drainage
« on: August 21, 2017, 08:27:15 PM »
I have a 100x300 garden that is compleatly flat. When does are hilled the hills dry out but the garden in between the rows stays wet. I can't get tractor in to cultivate. How do I get it to dry out with a clay base soil.

Offline Double B

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Re: Drainage
« Reply #1 on: August 21, 2017, 09:18:32 PM »
Corvette,

It really depends upon the topography of the surrounding area. If you can cut relief ditches and have an area to get the water away from the garden you can accomplish this task.

I suffer from the same relative condition that you do. I have relatively zero elevation difference on all of my property but have had to cut ditches and run some into my pond and others out to the road ditches. I have quite a bit of my property that is open and I had it precision leveled.  Our biggest problem is when the ditch out front backs up there is no where for the water to go.

Please give us a better description of your property and perhaps we can offer more assistance.
14.08 acres, John Deere 5055E, Stevens Row Hippers and cultivator, 8' Bush Hog, 74" Frontier Tiller, John Deere 655Z

Online Monroe

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Re: Drainage
« Reply #2 on: August 21, 2017, 09:21:39 PM »
I would first ask what did you do in the past or is this a new site. Do you have any run off at all after rain or a sheet of water on the surface. A garden site needs some drainage if you have any at all then a solution to your overall problem is in reach.

              Monroe
Jewel & I have had a beautiful journey together

Offline CORVETTE62US

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Re: Drainage
« Reply #3 on: August 21, 2017, 09:28:42 PM »
The land is all flat. When it rains there is no run off. There is no water running into the garden either. It just puddles up and won't soak in. Not sure what to do.

Online GopherBroke

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Re: Drainage
« Reply #4 on: August 22, 2017, 07:36:18 AM »
If you have somewhere near by (ditch) you can have drain tile installed but it has to have somewhere to discharge.  We are flat clay soil so I feel your pain.  The only other idea is to use soil amendment as a way to make the soil less dense.  I have forgotten the name, but I have read that a winter crop of radishes (ag cover crop) help to break up the hard pan that sometime comes with clay soil. 
zone 5b Half Haas Farm
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Riley, Indiana for the summer

Online jimmiec

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Re: Drainage
« Reply #5 on: August 22, 2017, 07:55:36 AM »
If you have somewhere near by (ditch) you can have drain tile installed but it has to have somewhere to discharge.  We are flat clay soil so I feel your pain.  The only other idea is to use soil amendment as a way to make the soil less dense.  I have forgotten the name, but I have read that a winter crop of radishes (ag cover crop) help to break up the hard pan that sometime comes with clay soil.

tillage radish
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Newbie (5th season) home gardener growing in raised beds annuals (generally 4'x20'), perennials, and fruit using non-mechanical, organic, and bio-intensive methods.

Offline Ben

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Re: Drainage
« Reply #6 on: August 22, 2017, 10:36:25 AM »
They are also sometimes listed as groundhog radishes.  They make a large radish root with a long tap root to penetrate the pan.

Ben

Northwest La. zone 8b

Online 1shotwade

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Re: Drainage
« Reply #7 on: August 22, 2017, 11:01:45 AM »
That's one of the reasons I have part of my garden in woodchips.It can rain hard and as soon as it stops I can walk out and work in the garden. The area I don't have chips on will sink to your knees! Of course with the woodchips down I don't have to fight with the weeds either.
Wade
Looks like I'm going to need more ammo!

Offline tangentalstorm

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Re: Drainage
« Reply #8 on: August 25, 2017, 09:14:47 AM »
Corvette along with all the other methods you have heard here when the ground dries out get in there with a subsoiler attachment....if you work your lines close enough together with it that will break the pan up pretty well and allow you some natural deep drainage....couple doing that with the radishes, soil amendments and a run off system after a couple of years you will have a very nice garden patch going.
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Online Daniel Grant

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Re: Drainage
« Reply #9 on: August 25, 2017, 12:47:27 PM »
Corvette,
Good to hear from you. I second the subsoiler and recommend growing a mixture of oats, millet, radish, buckwheat and later mow and till this in. I found as I have raised my amendment ratio my water issues have improved as my productivity. I cover my smaller garden with shreaded leaves, scatter nitrogen and lime and till this under every winter. Before I began this program I used a subsoiler. In the spring I just need a shallow surface till to prepare seed bed.
Dan
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