Author Topic: Canned Meatloaf  (Read 2003 times)

Offline sdiver40

  • Grasshopper
  • *
  • Posts: 14
  • Zone 7b
    • View Profile
Canned Meatloaf
« on: March 13, 2016, 11:08:20 AM »
We tried our hand at canning around 18 lbs. meatloaf last night. So far it looks pretty good. But havent giving it the test taste yet.
4 more quarts in the canner this morning.


Tom

Offline Blue Ridge Hillbilly

  • Grasshopper
  • *
  • Posts: 17
    • View Profile
Re: Canned Meatloaf
« Reply #1 on: March 13, 2016, 12:31:08 PM »
Let us know how it taste. I may want your recipe.

BRH

Offline Bcorley

  • Grasshopper
  • *
  • Posts: 84
    • View Profile
Re: Canned Meatloaf
« Reply #2 on: March 13, 2016, 01:22:00 PM »
Betcha anything it works.  I wanna know about a taste test myself.  Storage without refrigeration...wave of the future.     

Offline woodchip gardener

  • Dirt Dabber
  • ***
  • Posts: 2184
  • zone 7 - above Charlotte NC
    • View Profile
Re: Canned Meatloaf
« Reply #3 on: March 13, 2016, 01:44:16 PM »
i don't know much about canning.  when you put it in the canner doesn't it cook it a bit?
Inch by inch, row by row
Someone bless these seeds I sow
Someone warm them from below
Till the rain comes tumblin' down
-The Garden Song

Offline tbird

  • Global Moderator
  • Sprout
  • *****
  • Posts: 716
  • One Nation Under God!
    • View Profile
Re: Canned Meatloaf
« Reply #4 on: March 13, 2016, 02:00:39 PM »
The canner cooks it a lot.  I put raw meat and chicken in a canner and it cooks it completely in 75 to 90 minutes while making sure ALL harmful bacteria, virus and dangerous fungus spores like Botula are killed.  The purpose of pressure canning is to allow the use of higher temperatures than boiling.  Those temps kill things boiling could only kill after days.  In fact 20 minutes at 240 degrees will kill Botula spores whereas it would take over 40 hours at 212 degrees.  Imagine how your beans or chicken would look if you cooked it for 40+ hours.   :D

  I think that meatloaf will be good as far as consistency and safety.  Depending on the spices used will determine taste.  Certain spices like sage and a few other do not can well.  They tend to bitter out the entire jar.  Garlic, onion and most other spices are fine.  The best place to find out is do a web search for unfriendly canning spices.  If that meatloaf doesn't have any unfriendly spices it should be great.  One more thing.  Do not can anything with flour or ground grains in it.  Flour resists heat transfer and under certain circumstances will allow some unwanted bio agents to survive canning,  It is only in rare cases,  but Botula is nothing to fool with.

  Thanks for the picture  and the idea.  I will definitely try this.   ;)
Barking Dog Farm
18.25 Acres in Central West Louisiana
Zone 8B

WJ5Y    Amateur Extra




Click for weather forecast

Offline sdiver40

  • Grasshopper
  • *
  • Posts: 14
  • Zone 7b
    • View Profile
Re: Canned Meatloaf
« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2016, 04:49:10 PM »
Tbird hit it spot on. It does cook the meatloaf completely. Just dump it out and warm it up and your ready to go.
The only spices we used was garlic salt, Paprika, pepper, Emeril's original essence seasoning. Along with chopped onions and bell peppers and ketchup. The one thing we didnt add was salt. If I had it to do over I would defiantly add some salt. Maybe add 1/2 tsp. more of each spice.
Once cooked it does taste pretty good. It is not as firm as oven baked meatloaf but it's not soggy either.
For a first time try i'm pretty happy with the way it turned out.
Tom

Offline SpringTxGardener

  • Grasshopper
  • *
  • Posts: 165
  • Located between Spring and The Woodlands Texas, 9a
    • View Profile
Re: Canned Meatloaf
« Reply #6 on: March 13, 2016, 05:56:03 PM »
SDiver 40, I bet the meatloaf tastes delicious!     Are those jars the pint and one-half jars?     I bought 3 cases of those a couple of weeks ago to put up my carrots and I really like them.    Going to buy some more cases of them when my Walmart has them back in stock.
Arlie

Offline sdiver40

  • Grasshopper
  • *
  • Posts: 14
  • Zone 7b
    • View Profile
Re: Canned Meatloaf
« Reply #7 on: March 13, 2016, 06:09:29 PM »
SDiver 40, I bet the meatloaf tastes delicious!     Are those jars the pint and one-half jars?     I bought 3 cases of those a couple of weeks ago to put up my carrots and I really like them.    Going to buy some more cases of them when my Walmart has them back in stock.
Yes they are the pint and a half jars. They work real well on meat items. No inner shoulder for stuff to get hung up on and makes packing easier. That was the first time I have used them. I will be buying more of them when I get back to town. Plus I can get 8 of them in a 7 quart canner.
Tom

Offline GopherBroke

  • Sprout
  • **
  • Posts: 698
  • Half Haas Farm
    • View Profile
Re: Canned Meatloaf
« Reply #8 on: March 13, 2016, 06:40:22 PM »
You canners got my juices flow'n with all of these canned meats.  My freezer is about the size of a bread box and when y'all was talking about it on the old forum I got to thinking about canning meat just to save freezer space, and when I found that pressure cooker for $4.00 I was pumped, but then one of you schooled me on the difference between cookers and canners.  I might give it a whirl in the summer when I am back up north. 
zone 5b Half Haas Farm
Bill
Riley, Indiana for the summer

Offline woodchip gardener

  • Dirt Dabber
  • ***
  • Posts: 2184
  • zone 7 - above Charlotte NC
    • View Profile
Re: Canned Meatloaf
« Reply #9 on: March 13, 2016, 09:50:13 PM »
thanks all for clarifying.  i am glad it worked out for you.  :)
Inch by inch, row by row
Someone bless these seeds I sow
Someone warm them from below
Till the rain comes tumblin' down
-The Garden Song

Offline tbird

  • Global Moderator
  • Sprout
  • *****
  • Posts: 716
  • One Nation Under God!
    • View Profile
Re: Canned Meatloaf
« Reply #10 on: March 14, 2016, 10:06:46 AM »
  I like the taste and convenience of canned meats.  Canned meats taste really good and for the most part have a really good consistency.  The cooking is already done and things like chicken soup or beef stew can be made in minutes.  Also there is the storage cost/convenience thing.  Canned goods use "zero" power in storage and do not get freezer burn.  Also if you live in an area that loses power often for up to one or two days it is more than convenient.  Hurricane  Rita took the power from up here from anywhere between 8 and 17 days.  Everyone was scrambling to eat up there expensive meats before they went bad.  The ones with electric stoves were in real trouble.    :(

  Home canned foods do not leach chemicals from plastic liners into the foods.  If you can get truly fresh foods from reliable trustworthy food processors then you can be pretty sure of getting foods that are free of or at least greatly reduced in hormones, antibiotics and chemicals.  I know Zaycon chicken (purchased over the internet and picked up at a pre-determined place and time)  is the best chicken I have ever gotten.  It has no salt/water solutions added and is only a day or two old when received.  Amazing stuff for a price that is also great.   I use it now almost exclusively for chicken breast canning.   ;)

  I would suggest to anyone wanting to try canning to get going on it.  There are a bunch of people that can on this forum.  The first thing to do is try it.  Something simple like skinless boneless chicken breast, pork loin or beef roast.  Those are simple.  meats to start with.  As Always though I suggest starting with Green Beans as a first step in pressure canning.  You will learn the basic skills you will need using a product that is easier to can than meats for beginners.  Once you get a couple sessions done with veggies you can move on to things requiring a bit more care and extra steps. 

  The biggest thing in canning is choosing a canner.   In my 8 years experience I would say that persons that will can occasionally can get by with the smaller cheaper pressure cookers made by Presto.  People that will can a lot each year should invest in a better unit like one of the larger All American models. I myself like a weighted cooker.  Some like cookers with a gauge.  Gauges lose calibration over time.  Weights do not. 

  Either way, ask questions, get started, enjoy the canning as well as the eating of the canned goods.  There are few things in this world as satisfying as sitting at a table looking at a cluster of canned goods in those clear jars.  Makes you feel smart and a bit wiser than most.  You really feel good when you look at it when the power goes off. :D
« Last Edit: March 14, 2016, 10:10:24 AM by tbird »
Barking Dog Farm
18.25 Acres in Central West Louisiana
Zone 8B

WJ5Y    Amateur Extra




Click for weather forecast

Offline btrcj

  • Grasshopper
  • *
  • Posts: 7
    • View Profile
Re: Canned Meatloaf
« Reply #11 on: March 17, 2016, 01:40:56 PM »
I bought a presto 16 Qt canner at an estate sale a couple months ago.
We tried our first qt of canned chicken thighs last night after my wife and i arrived home at the same time.

I opened the jar into a skillet to heat as my wife chopped a tomato.
less then 20 minutes later we were enjoying some excellent chicken tacos.
Now that is convenience food.

I see an All American 930 in my future.

C.J.


Offline GopherBroke

  • Sprout
  • **
  • Posts: 698
  • Half Haas Farm
    • View Profile
Re: Canned Meatloaf
« Reply #12 on: December 05, 2016, 03:56:01 PM »
Well I had to walk the walk as they say.  Someone gave me a 3 LB package of fresh hamburger an as a single guy that is a lot of meat to use up, so I bought another 3 lbs and canned it all.  Its not much different from canning vegetables, other than time in the canner, that is attention to details is everything.  I had posted earlier this year that my freezer is so small, and now I can store burger without taking up space.  I did some grocery shopping the other day and see that pork is really cheap and I may buy some and can it too. 
zone 5b Half Haas Farm
Bill
Riley, Indiana for the summer