Author Topic: Basic Soil Science (by Larry the Soilguy)  (Read 1833 times)

Offline tbird

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Basic Soil Science (by Larry the Soilguy)
« on: April 02, 2016, 02:24:00 PM »
  This is a Microsoft Power Point Presentation of "Basic Soil Science" that was put together by Soilguy "Larry" while he was at teh TExas Soil Lab.  Larry is a PhD in Agriculture Science and is a member here.  He hasn't been around in a while and I hope he will return soon.

  You need power Point for this to run on your computer.  It is an excellent presentation.   ;)
 
Power Point Presentation:
  http://mserepair.com/TBGF/Basic%20Soil%20Science%20TOFGA%202013.ppt


Adobe Reader File:   This is a larger 11.0Mb file
  http://mserepair.com/TBGF/BSSP.pdf
« Last Edit: April 05, 2017, 09:28:50 AM by tbird »
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Online Daniel Grant

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Re: Basic Soil Science
« Reply #1 on: April 02, 2016, 05:21:51 PM »
Tbird,
I really appreciate you posting this. Is there another installment about ways to amend the soil to help return some of the fertility to the soil that has been depleted from years of planting with just the use of chemical fertilizer? I found it very helpful. I do have a question, oops couple of questions, about tilling. How does a tiller (Rototiller/power) Affect the soil microbes, soil structure and available use of nutrients for plants? What is the best way to till a garden to have the least negative affect nutrient use, soil structure and availability to plants? I live in coastal GA and have sandy soil. When I use a tiller it leaves the soil like flour and very aerated. Even after a rain my HOSS seeder will sink 2 to 3 inches when going down the row planting.
Thanks for taking the time to answer my questions.
Dan
Kubota 7100, L210, Allis G, TroyBilt, Horse, Gravely, Dr. Bush mower, Tuff Bilt tractor

Offline tbird

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Re: Basic Soil Science
« Reply #2 on: April 03, 2016, 01:00:17 AM »
  I will search my source for another or similar presentation as this one.

  Tilling has little effect on soil microbe population.  In times after heavy rains tilling as soon as possible can have a positive effect in that it aerates soil to aid beneficial microbes and deters harmful anaerobic ones.  As far as nutrient availability,  tilling reduces stratification of nutrients that are suspended in the soil in layers.  It also brings up nutrients that may be located deeper due to root depth utilizing more nutrients in the upper soil area rather than deeper.  One trade off, but is easily fixable, is nitrogen loss. Usable Nitrogen is usually in the form of Ammonium (NH4) which is a more volatile chemical than other nutrients.  That being the case tilling allows the more volatile materials to dissipate into the air.  Nitrogen however is an easy fix by adding high nitrogen fertilizers as chicken doo or some 33-0-0.   ;)

  Soil structure damage is touted by many but it is a still debated topic.  Some soil structure is damaged or destroyed but some things tilling disturbs in some areas are not present in others.  Worm tunnels for example are lost but they do not exist in sandy soils to start with.  Also nutrient stratification is more of a problem is sandy soils because they do not hols the higher levels of organic materials to hold onto the nutrients as water drains down through it.  Sandy soils tend to benefit more from tilling that well established humus soils with high organic content.

  My soil is classified as >sandy/loam by the LSU Ag Dept.  Sandy I agree with but the loam part I am still looking for.  It is like yours.  When I till my large garden the surface rises 3" to 4" and walking in it is like walking in a can of Talcum Powder.  If I hill it to 14" or so in a week the hills are only about 6" high and a good rain will  beat them almost flat.  So is fine sandy soil.


Barking Dog Farm
18.25 Acres in Central West Louisiana
Zone 8B

WJ5Y    Amateur Extra




Click for weather forecast