Author Topic: FIGS  (Read 4613 times)

Online PawPaw gene

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FIGS
« on: July 05, 2016, 02:36:13 PM »
Finally in what seem forever since last season, I can now eat some fresh figs. My Cajun Gold tree is loaded and just starting to ripen some. This hot dry weather is perfect for the figs. They are the sweetest they've been in years due to the hot dry weather. Cajun Gold figs are much like LSU Gold but don't have the flat end on them. The tree is also a lot more productive than and LSU Gold tree that I've ever seen. I wish some of you were closer to share with me.
"gene"






Offline cappy

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2016, 03:56:01 PM »
They look amazing Gene are they as sweet as the brown ones?? ours are very sweet and we have 3 gallon bags full in the freezer will be canning a batch soon.

Online Ragun Gardener

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2016, 04:16:43 PM »
WOW, it looks like syrup inside.

Online PawPaw gene

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2016, 05:54:25 PM »
Cappy I'm not sure without an instrument to measure, but it's a sweet as the sweetest fig I've ever eaten.

Rajun, they are very juicy.
"gene"

Offline jimmiec

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #4 on: July 06, 2016, 11:20:16 AM »
The figs look great.

Is there a good online resource to help identify what variety a fig tree is?  Was at a friends house last night and checked on his figs but he has no clue what kind of tree.  I can't wait for my trees to start producing. 

Wish they were doing Fig Day in Baton Rouge this year.  May be 2017?
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Transplanted to Lafayette, LA (Zone 9a)
Newbie (6th season) home gardener growing in raised beds annuals (generally 4'x20'), perennials, and fruit using non-mechanical, organic, and bio-intensive methods.

Online PawPaw gene

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #5 on: July 06, 2016, 06:13:41 PM »
The best thing is to post a picture here of a whole fig, a fig cut in half and a picture of a mature leaf. That's a starting point which can lead in the possible direction of an identity. There are thousands of varieties but only a few are very common which makes it easy sometimes.
"gene"

Offline wdkerek

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2016, 07:31:12 PM »
Those look fantastic!!

I have the LSU gold and you are correct......not a good producer and I can't get to them before the mocking birds do.......LOL......they ate the last one this morning in fact.....

I had a handful of celeste off the bush this evening after cutting grass

Offline saute86

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2016, 10:01:36 PM »
Paw Paw those look great. When I picked mine they were dripping syrup and the bees were in the tree with me.
My hobbies are hunting, fishing, gardening and foraging mushrooms.
I have 27 years experience as a chef.

Offline billygoat

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #8 on: July 07, 2016, 12:17:15 AM »
I thought my LSU Gold was sick or something-  it's a very slow grower compared to other figs I have and this year only has about 6 to 10 figs on it.  I have much more productive varieties including Gene's Cajun Gold.  (Thanks Gene  :)  ).    Bill

Offline MudHog

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #9 on: July 14, 2016, 11:11:27 AM »
Would this be Cajun Gold? Here at my new office we have about 12-14 Fig trees that are supposedly each a different Fig. These have the same kind of hole at the bottom and over ripe ones drip liquid out the bottom.
« Last Edit: July 14, 2016, 11:16:38 AM by MudHog »
New Iberia, LA - Zone 9a

Online PawPaw gene

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #10 on: July 14, 2016, 01:47:31 PM »
No the Cajun Gold ripens yellow with no other color showing.
"gene"

Offline OrangeTxn

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #11 on: April 15, 2017, 05:36:14 AM »
I'm thinking fig preserves, already. It looks like it's going to be a good season. This is an LSU Gold fig that hangs over the fence from a neighbor's yard. I'm the beneficiary since they don't care for them. They let me have all I want. The taste isn't bad, but rain at the wrong time will readily crack and spoil them. 
Location: Orange, Tx; Southeast Gulf Coast, zone 9a.  Small home garden.

Online PawPaw gene

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #12 on: April 15, 2017, 08:53:30 PM »
Those surely look like LSU Golds to me and a good crop at that. They can be deliciously sweet when ripened in dry weather, but let too much rain fall and you have nothing but soured figs. I find that those figs are a little too large and fall apart to easy to make the best preserves. Also once cooked they don't have much flavor like a Celeste fig would. I have such a tree and a Cajun Gold which is pretty close to the same but we use them for fresh eating and not preserving. I have a Native Black tree which should give me enough for a jar or two of preserves for the first time. I'm anxious to see how well they take to cooking and how they taste. I'm also waiting on my Black Celeste to bear enough to preserve. Dark figs usually make better preserves as they are more flavorful. Light figs are more sweet and better for fresh eating.
"gene"

Offline OrangeTxn

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #13 on: April 16, 2017, 03:47:30 AM »
Gene - Thank you for replying.  Your input is always appreciated.  In the past, I've usually used Celeste figs for jelly/preserves.  It never occurred to me that the LSU Gold figs might not work as well.  I'm glad you shared your experience.  I may try to make a very small batch for comparison, but I'd hate to have gone to the effort of making a large batch, only to be disappointed.

This particular tree never gets pruned and is roughly 12 years old.  It's gotten big and has a pretty good spread and height to it.  It usually produces lots of figs, but the quality varies significantly depending on the weather.  Typically, I eat the figs straight off the tree, but I have to compete with the birds, raccoons and possums for the fruit :)
 
Thanks again.
Location: Orange, Tx; Southeast Gulf Coast, zone 9a.  Small home garden.

Online PawPaw gene

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #14 on: April 20, 2017, 11:24:58 AM »
Orange, Pick the figs a little under ripe and still firm. That will help hold them together and you will still get the same flavor from them which isn't much.
They will be very light tasting, mostly sweet.
"gene"

Offline cappy

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #15 on: April 21, 2017, 07:49:31 PM »
our tree is full of little figlets.  Here is the way we amke my family recipe for canned figs:
http://cappyandpegody.blogspot.com/2017/04/pallet-whacking.html

This is the recipe and how to post about another old family recipe for strawberry figs:
http://cappyandpegody.blogspot.com/2014/08/strawberry-figs.html

Try those old fashoned recipe's they are very good!!

Let us know how ya like em.

Offline OrangeTxn

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #16 on: April 22, 2017, 06:16:56 AM »
Cappy - Thanks for sharing the recipes.  I'll definitely give them a shot.  Figs are one of my favorite fruit to use in preserves/jelly.
Location: Orange, Tx; Southeast Gulf Coast, zone 9a.  Small home garden.

Offline Okie Bob

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #17 on: May 01, 2017, 09:39:42 AM »
Hey Gene, my fig trees didn't make it through the winter. I planted two last year. One is totally dead but, the other has a bunch of sprouts coming up from the root of the tree. They are maybe a foot tall now. Should I go ahead and take it out or let it continue to grow? If it grows, it looks like it will have several sprouts coming up off the year old root.

On another issue, how's the crappie doing down there this year? Suspect the spawn is over down there by now?
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Online PawPaw gene

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #18 on: May 04, 2017, 08:48:29 AM »
Hi Bob, good morning after a rough night here.
Lot of rain, wind, and lightning, I didn't sleep well last night.

Leave the fig tree, in some areas where figs cannot make it through the winter they will die back and sprout back in Spring. Not all but some will make figs on those new sprouts. My brother in TN has a Celeste that came from our Dads that dies back each year. In Spring it grows new sprouts which bear figs. After the tree goes dormant and before freezes start, on my advice he prunes all the sprouts to about 1 foot above the ground and then covers whats left with a big stack of leaves to insulate the area. It has survived like that for the last 7 or 8 years without a problem. Give it a try, you will lose nothing and may gain some figs. Some times a tree will get more tolerant to cold as it gets older and you will not have to prune it back.

Yes the spawn is well past. We had such a warm winter that some fish were found with eggs ready to lay in October and November. Our usual spawn is in February and March with it stretching into May if we have a cold winter and cool spring. Linda and I did do much good on spawning fish. Oh, we caught more than enough to eat and share a few, but no big hauls. In fact we caught more bass during that period that crappie. The fish have moved on to post spawn rest where we caught hardly any. I haven't been fishing in 3 weeks. Friends have let me know that they are beginning to bite again but the unsettled weather has kept me off the water. The storms of the past week added close to 10 inches of water so that will have the water high and muddy. If the weather does as it is suppose to we might be going crabbing this weekend. The following week should be better for fishing and we'll hit the water again.

How has your spring fishing been?
"gene"

Offline OrangeTxn

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Re: FIGS
« Reply #19 on: June 04, 2017, 04:40:34 AM »
The Mockingbirds were my clue.  As soon as I saw them show up, I knew I better head over to the neighbor's fig tree and start picking.  To the best of my knowledge, the tree is an LSU Gold, and it's loaded with fruit which has just started reaching the ripe stage.  The neighbor doesn't care for figs, so he lets me have all I want.  So, like a fat raccoon, I get out and compete with the birds for the figs.  Of those shown in my hand, the smaller, middle, "greener" fig wasn't quite ripe.  It was pliable to the touch, but the eye hadn't started to open yet.  I picked it to test how early I could harvest the figs, and it needed a few more days.  It wasn't bad, it just wasn't sweet.  The others were fat, juicy orbs of tastiness.  I'm one satisfied customer, even if I do have to share with the birds ;)
Location: Orange, Tx; Southeast Gulf Coast, zone 9a.  Small home garden.