Author Topic: Heavy Duty Raised Beds  (Read 1273 times)

Offline james150

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Heavy Duty Raised Beds
« on: April 09, 2017, 03:35:56 AM »
Recently while traveling I saw these heavy-duty raised bed gardens.  They appear to be made of galvanized steel and the powder coated.  They sit at a convenient height for seated weeding and even incorporate tabs and attachments for drip irrigation.  I'd love to have some (my raised beds are oak) but I bet they are pricy.  I'd never seen anything like these before and thought I'd share some pictures.

Regards,

Jim
Faith Farms is a family run flower and vegetable farm in the heart of Amish country in the picturesque Driftless Region of Southwestern Wisconsin. Our farm is directly across the road from the Vernon Vineyards and Pedretti Party Barn


Offline Maggie13

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Re: Heavy Duty Raised Beds
« Reply #1 on: April 09, 2017, 06:00:47 AM »
Raised Beds for less bending is a great idea.
 
I just don't know if I would want powder coating next to my veggies.

 Being a carpenter by trade I would choose to build with wood.
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Re: Heavy Duty Raised Beds
« Reply #2 on: April 09, 2017, 07:54:59 AM »
hi jim.  thanks for posting!

they look kinda thick to be steel.  did you knock on them?  they look to be more like painted wood.  if they were that thick and steel  they would weigh a ton!

i am on the fence about raised beds like this.  i agree with maggie that the less bending we have to do is awesome...but since the water would not naturally leach out into the ground for this type of bed you would need to have drainage holes for when it rains.  that can lead to dry beds.

if i was going to make a  tall raised bed or if you wanted to modify your current bed, i would make the frame on ground and just build it taller.  you can fill the bottom with varying size stone to allow for heavy water drainage and take up some space.  the stones would allow for excess drainage but still hold the light moisture in better than just having it run out the bottom through holes. plus it would deter burrowing critters from getting up in.


Offline Okie Bob

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Re: Heavy Duty Raised Beds
« Reply #3 on: April 09, 2017, 08:47:20 AM »
I see a couple of problems with those beds. First, to fill them you can't just dump a wheelbarrow into them and would have to manually transfer the dirt/compost/whatever. Second, you created a place for weeds to grow that you don't have with the beds on the ground. Plus the extra expense. I just use 2X12's, 12' long. First ones I made were 4' wide but, latest one is 3' wide and much easier to reach across for weeding or harvesting or whatever. just sayin.........
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Offline Double B

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Re: Heavy Duty Raised Beds
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2017, 11:28:57 AM »
I see some problems with them too but I see some great advantages as well. The older I get (and I'm not that old  ;)) the less bending over seems to suit me. I had never had an back issues until this year and it is debilitating when it happens. Also being off the ground, I would think the battle with fire ants would be easier to win. Raised beds here are fire ant heaven and coffee grounds, diatomaceous earth and other things may run them out for a while but as soon as heavy rains return the beds on the ground are full of ants. Standing up gardening would be a lot easier so I see pros and cons of each method. I would certainly want to use materials with less toxicity if there is such a thing but these beds look awfully nice to me. Thanks for sharing James.
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Offline TheCutNShootTiredGuy

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Re: Heavy Duty Raised Beds
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2017, 01:01:51 PM »
Those are some Serious Sheet Metal Pan on Iron Frame Raise Beds. Looks like a Custom build or a Sheet Metal worker's personnel project. Could be Recycled Industrial materials. I've got the Equipment and the Skills but not the inclination. I would take the Beds if offered.

Offline Okie Bob

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Re: Heavy Duty Raised Beds
« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2017, 06:17:17 AM »
BB, I definitely agree with you about bending over and old age. Problem is I'm about 6'2" and the beds pictured here still require bending over somewhat at least. Might even be more difficult. With my raised beds, I can at least sit on the 2X12's, don't know if that would be possible in the pictured ones. But, they sure do look great!
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Offline tbird

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Re: Heavy Duty Raised Beds
« Reply #7 on: April 10, 2017, 11:18:47 PM »
  I built smaller but similar raised beds 10 years ago.  First of all it did not prevent or even deter ants.  They infested it regularly since the young queens fly in.  Second of all raised off the ground like that they tend to heat up and cool down faster which required more frequent watering in summer and in winter they tend to freeze easier and I am in zone 8B.  Those were two of the cons.  They do remove a lot of stress from the back of the gardener.  They seem to be less prone to stray grass or weeds popping up since they are farther above the ground and less likely to catch a horizontally blown seed like a lower bed.  They are almost totally resistant to slugs and other ground crawling critters especially if you grease the legs of the supports or place lye soap on a string around the legs so the soap creates an sticky goo that repels insects or sticks them there.  Also being isolated from the ground,  if you happen to get something like Fusarium, Verticillium or other soil dwelling fungi or bacteria it is a breeze to fumigate the soil.

  The pros far outweigh the cons,  but there are limitations you will discover with experience. 
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Offline james150

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Re: Heavy Duty Raised Beds
« Reply #8 on: April 11, 2017, 12:19:41 PM »
Wow,
Thanks for all the helpful replies . . .my main issue with these beds is cost . . .I don't know how much they cost but I bet it's a lot.

Great replies and food for thought.

Regards,

Jim
Faith Farms is a family run flower and vegetable farm in the heart of Amish country in the picturesque Driftless Region of Southwestern Wisconsin. Our farm is directly across the road from the Vernon Vineyards and Pedretti Party Barn