Author Topic: Odin the dog.  (Read 1106 times)

Offline ksp313

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Odin the dog.
« on: October 16, 2017, 06:32:04 PM »
Ran across a wonderful story today on the nets about a Great Pyrenees named Odin who managed to bring his flock of goats through one of the wildfires in California last week though he was somewhat injured. Google "Odin the dog" and you'll find the story. I'm not smart enough to know how to post a link.

Offline Ben

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Re: Odin the dog.
« Reply #1 on: October 16, 2017, 07:22:35 PM »
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Offline ksp313

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Re: Odin the dog.
« Reply #2 on: October 16, 2017, 07:58:51 PM »
Thanks Ben!

Offline Ben

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Re: Odin the dog.
« Reply #3 on: October 16, 2017, 08:11:43 PM »
You quite welcome ksp313.

Note:  It requires latest version of Adobe flashplayer to play video.
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Online Maggie13

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Re: Odin the dog.
« Reply #4 on: October 16, 2017, 11:41:38 PM »
Thanks. I like stories about working dogs especially with happy endings!
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Online Rabbitproof

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Re: Odin the dog.
« Reply #5 on: October 17, 2017, 05:09:56 AM »
Brave and loyal----always said we should all learn from our dogs. I think they were put on earth to remind us how we should be!

Offline Double B

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Re: Odin the dog.
« Reply #6 on: October 17, 2017, 08:02:38 AM »
What a great story. These are truly amazing animals. One of our neighbors has a Great Pyrenees down the road and he is huge. They have about sixty head of cattle and this dog is always out with the herd every time I go by. He knows exactly what his job is.

The enjoyment we get from our dogs is immeasurable and I know many of you feel the same way.

Thanks for posting!!
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Offline Ben

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Re: Odin the dog.
« Reply #7 on: October 17, 2017, 05:55:29 PM »
I found another article on Odin the dog.  The article read that some baby  deer even joined in the flock.
It also has another video of the reunion at the bottom of article although they are not show in the video.

Nature works in strange and beautiful way.

https://www.treehugger.com/pets/odin-dog-protects-his-goats-during-sonoma-fire-takes-baby-deer-too.html
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Offline ksp313

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Re: Odin the dog.
« Reply #8 on: October 17, 2017, 06:44:54 PM »
Yes, there are many outlets with different takes on this story. Some of you that having working dogs, help me understand what motivates these dogs? Why do they do it? Is it simply instinct? Do they do it to please their owners? To please the goats? Do they even like the goats? Do the goats like the dogs? Odin here seemed monumentally committed to his small flock, his owner stating he didn't think he could get him away from them despite the fire! The world needs more Odins.

Offline MikeM

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Re: Odin the dog.
« Reply #9 on: October 23, 2017, 07:11:50 PM »
It's their instincts but it goes back for a 1000 years or more in many/most breeds. They will literally give their lives for their charges.   Our Pyrenees has been teaching our Akbash pup to stay with the sheep while she goes out and checks a fence line.  I have seen her stay behind with the sheep while the pup patrols but in the process she is showing him that one of them needs to be with the sheep when they sense danger.  We had issues with the Pyrenees when she was a bit younger but they respond well to positive training.

The old school way was just to put a pup in with live stock and expect a good result.  That is why you see so many of them in the pounds.  Their instinct is to play when they are pups like any other dog and they can injure or kill lambs in the process.  The mama ewes will head butt the biggest of dogs when they see their lambs being messed with but guard dogs can be determined to do what they want.

I'll post a picture of our two guardians in another thread.
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Offline MikeM

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Re: Odin the dog.
« Reply #10 on: October 23, 2017, 07:16:07 PM »
Something else I meant to post about them.  At first animals in a guardians care will usually not take to them and will even head butt the dogs.  Most dogs take it to a point but they will do some mild discipline to an unruly animal and we even let our dogs act food aggressive to our sheep or they would go hungry.  They make a lot of noise and lunge at the sheep to scare them off but never use their teeth. Our herding dogs on the other hand will use teeth enough to make a hesitant animal get moving.  It doesn't take long for the sheep to learn that the dogs are their protector and you can watch when the dog starts alerting (barking) the sheep will head toward the dogs general vicinity for protection.
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Offline ksp313

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Re: Odin the dog.
« Reply #11 on: October 24, 2017, 08:09:08 PM »
Thanks MikeM, I was hoping you would ring in as I have so enjoyed your posts and pics regarding working dogs. Please post more. I think everybody here loves your pics of your awesome farm and animals and obvious expertise on working dogs. I so admire the devotion and commitment exhibited by Odin the hero Pyeraynse and his ability to bring his flock through a devastating fire, I hope the goats in some way can appreciate that too.

Offline MikeM

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Re: Odin the dog.
« Reply #12 on: October 24, 2017, 08:32:47 PM »
I have seen several articles about Odin and his critters and they are awesome.  These dogs are without doubt some of the best that we could want.

We have a stray dog or a coyote mixed breed that several of our neighbors have seen in the morning going on the fringes of our property.  Our Great Pyrenees usually comes up to our catch pen every morning to get fed but not this morning.  We got a call from a neighbor this morning that he had seen a stray dog or coyote heading toward our place.  The dogs were down in that area and wouldn't even come up to be fed so I took their food down to them.  They ate and went down to the fence line where the thought the threat was and settled down to watch the area.  They are awesome animals.  You can make a secure fence line with electric wire but it is even better watching the dogs do their thing.  :)
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Offline ksp313

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Re: Odin the dog.
« Reply #13 on: November 12, 2017, 09:09:24 AM »
Turns out Odins story touched many hearts. Someone started a funding website for funds to replace some of the buildings and shelters destroyed in the fire, with a stated goal of $45k, donations now exceed $83k! The owner declared any funds raised in excess of the goal would be donated to local animal rescue efforts and shelters. That a win/win in my book. Oh, and Odin and his owner were invited and did appear on the Steve Harvey Show. Good on you Odin! I'm positive as I write this that Odin is wondering what all the fuss was about and simply wishes to be left alone to guard his small band of goats.