Author Topic: Kelly Winterton Green mountain Multiplier onions  (Read 7007 times)

woodchip gardener

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Re: Kelly Winterton Green mountain Multiplier onions
« Reply #20 on: April 03, 2018, 05:49:55 PM »
well mags, your vigilance is rewarded...here is a pic of the first ones i put out.  the second round have not grown that much yet and not sure they will do much, but these are chugging right along.


Offline Daniel Grant

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Re: Kelly Winterton Green mountain Multiplier onions
« Reply #21 on: April 04, 2018, 06:54:44 PM »
They look like Shallots when they are growing also. I am currently growing 4 different types of shallots ant the grow the same and look very similar.
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woodchip gardener

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Re: Kelly Winterton Green mountain Multiplier onions
« Reply #22 on: April 07, 2018, 11:37:28 AM »
hi daniel

yes, potato onions and shallots are pretty much the same thing.  from what i read in mr. wintertons papers, the potato onion has a more pungent flavor than a shallot and will store better as well.  he said the egyptian walking onions are not in the same group, but shallots and potato onions are in the same family.




Offline Daniel Grant

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Re: Kelly Winterton Green mountain Multiplier onions
« Reply #23 on: April 09, 2018, 04:38:39 PM »
Woodchip,
I read everthing available relating to Mr. Winterton and his potato onions. I planted 4 different kinds of shallots this year. French Grey, French Reds and 2 different types of organically grown from two different grocery stores. The two French types cluster but they do not get big. They are highly prized and sought after by chefs for their flavor. They were purchased from a California grower selling on eBay. Every one of his has grown very well. The leaves on these types are a cluster but fairly small in height and diameter. Each leaf set will be from a different developing shallot. In my reading about the 2 French types it seems if you harvest and replant your own harvested shallots they will adapt to your soil and evironment and will get larger over time. This does not mean they will ever get as large as onions. The ones from the store have also flurished and their leaves are also clustered but much longer and larger in diameter. In fact some of the plants are producing scapes like hardneck garlic that are curled. This is very interesting which (to my thinking) indicates a difference in genetic origin from the 2 French types. The ones from the grocery store were larger and some were rounder. These may be related to the potato onions.  I planted a pound of shallots purchased from Morgan County and none sprouted. I have friends who live in the northern parts of the US who commercially grow shallots and grow from seed and transplant like onions. That is a different shallot than the 2 French ones. As Mr. Winterton said over time (successive planting) his strain slowly lost seed production and he planted from bulbs/cloves. This is the first year I have grown the Shallots and have about 125 feet planted at 6 inch intervals. This is also the first year planting garlic and planted 6 different types of softneck garlic with about 150 feet at 6 inch intervals. I live in coastal Georgia and I believe the softneck will produce better here than hard neck (Do better with a harsher winter than here) but there is some discussion about this. There is a Cajun garlic from the New Orleans area that I believe is a hardneck (but I could be wrong and it could be a softneck). It reportedly adapted to the climate there over time. I would like to obtain some of it for fall planting. Potato onions and shallots are a close genetic relation. Some shallots keep longer than others and keep longer than onions.
Kubota 7100, L210, Allis G, John Deere 1050, TroyBilt, Horse, Gravely, Dr. Bush mower, Tuff Bilt tractor, David Bradley tractors for cultivation

woodchip gardener

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Re: Kelly Winterton Green mountain Multiplier onions
« Reply #24 on: April 11, 2018, 09:12:38 AM »
hi daniel

from what i have read, creole garlic is hard to come by.  there are a few places on the web you can get some.  a guy has some bulbils on sale right now.

https://www.ebay.com/itm/GARLIC-Burgundy-rare-Creole-garlic-ORGANIC-25-bulbils-for-propagation/142480096421?hash=item212c79bca5:g:fM0AAOSwilBZl2Q8

 i also found this site that has some

http://www.filareefarm.com/seed-garlic-for-sale/Creole-Seed-Garlic/

woodchip gardener

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Re: Kelly Winterton Green mountain Multiplier onions
« Reply #25 on: April 19, 2018, 07:43:49 AM »
well, i am excited since the 2nd round of bulbs i had put out seem to really be taking off now.  hopefully i can get all of these to nest out and have some bulbs to put out again in the fall.

this has been a fun experiment so far.  :)